PR Executive, one of the most stressful jobs

January 15, 2012 § Leave a comment

Career Cast has come out with “The most stressful jobs of 2012” and to my surprise, Public Relations Executive followed not far behind Police Officer.

At #7 on the list, PR Executives even come before the Corporate Executive on the stress test. This doesn’t mean that every Public Relations Executive is going to have an extremely stressful job; it just means the majority of them do. Just the same, the police officer who sits behind a desk for eight hours a day isn’t going to be as stressed out as the one who patrols the streets.

Why is the Public Relations Executive so high on the list? PR Executives are in charge of maintaining the positive image of the corporation, company, person or government entity they represent. Sometimes this is a difficult task, especially when the client is involved in any type of scandal or controversy. Being the intermediate of communication, the PR Executive often acts as the voice of the client while interacting with the media and the public. In a very competitive field, meeting deadlines and making speeches is a large part of the job.

Ironically, the Event Planner comes in at #6 on the list, which is often categorized as a type of Public Relations.  Moral of the story… If you’re looking for a place to relax, the Public Relations industry is probably not for you. But if you’re looking for a career that is going to keep you on your toes and give your something different to do everyday, then you’re on the right track.

This post can also be read on Marketing Conversations and Business 2 Community.

Tweepsmap – Mapping out your followers

December 22, 2011 § Leave a comment

Have you ever wondered where your twitter followers are from? A new app, Tweepsmap, can show you. All you need to do is authorize the app and in a matter of seconds, Tweepsmap will show you exactly where all of your followers are from using the information your followers gave Twitter when they first signed up for their accounts.

Tweepsmap shows the location of your followers in a Google map. It also allows you to display your followers’ locations as a list and a pie chart. Personally, I like the google maps view because it allows you to zoom in and out and view your followers location by country, state, or city.

This tool is not only interesting for the average user, but could be a great tool for businesses. By using Tweepsmap, business owners could see that they have a lot of followers in Europe and not as many in the US. If they’re marketing to people in the US, then they’re missing out on a large amount of business they could be receiving from Europe. Tweepsmap can show business owners when they’re missing specific locations with their marketing and when they’re right on target.

Although it’s a relatively basic app, it’s pretty interesting and if you’re not a business owner, it’s still pretty cool to see where all of your followers are from.

You can also read this post on Marketing Conversations and Business 2 Community.

Social Media: It’s All About Strategy

December 20, 2011 § 1 Comment

Although social media may be “the new media,” it’s no longer new. It’s been around long enough that simply creating a Facebook or twitter page isn’t necessarily going to get people to click that “like” or “follow” button; you need to be persuasive. Being persuasive in social media is key to getting your message heard, because if you don’t make it worthwhile for someone to click on your page, you’re wasting not only their time, but yours as well.

Being strategic is key. You wouldn’t build a house without blueprints or start a business without a plan, so why would you make a facebook fan page if you don’t have a focused goal? That plan doesn’t have to be as strict as blueprints for a house and, yes, the plan can change as the medium and goal does. But you should always have one main focus. The focus can be to create a community, to raise awareness, to generate a conversation, but whatever it is, make sure it is clear and you understand how you’re going to execute it.

Here are a few tips to help you along the process, with some help from Mashable’s, 6 ways to be more persuasive with social media:

Be Likeable. And no, this doesn’t have anything to do with the “like” button on facebook. Ask yourself, “Do people like me?” Being likable means being genuine and honest, because no one likes a liar. Not only do you need to be honest but you need to be nice too. Watch your tone and make sure you’re interacting with people in a pleasant, polite and sincere manner.

Make people want to listen to you. This means showing off. Have you ever been published? Do you write for a well-known blog? Talk about it. What about building a company or developing software? If you’ve done anything noteworthy, brag about it, but in a tactful manner, of course. Showing that you have been professionally recognized for your achievements proves that you are worth listening to.

Get popular. Make yourself available, but not too available. Creating specific, well known, times to be online for twitter chat or setting deadlines for sales and promotions will help. The more followers and fans you have, the more likely people are going to think, “Well, this person must have something good to say.”

Hopefully these tips and tricks can help you while you start up or revamp your social media pages. If you need any tips on good tools to use feel free to visit a previous post, Social media tools you should be using for personal use, because these tool are good for business, too!

Read this post on Marketing Conversations and Business 2 Community too!

PROskore: Cool new tool for business professionals

November 25, 2011 § Leave a comment

It looks like Klout has some new competition. PROskore is the newest system on the web that measures your influence, not your social influence, but your professional influence. Although at first glance it may appear that Klout and PROskore are basically the same thing, they’re not. Klout measures your social influence, while PROskore measures your professional reputation.

According to PROskore CEO explains why it’s better than Klout by Shira Levine, PROskore CEO, Bill Jula, created the site to measure the profession reputation of its users by giving more weight to things like “LinkedIn activity, Facebook Fan Pages, etc., [and] ironically, a small part of [PROskore’s] scoring algorithm takes into account the Klout score itself.” The PROskore is not only calculated by your professional social networking sites, but from your PROskore page as well, including your “professional experience and recommendations [you] receive through the PROskore community,” as stated in the PROskore site. The three primary scoring mechanisms used are your outside social media influence on social networking sites (this is where you twitter and facebook fan pages come in to play), your activity on PROskore, and your professional resume.

PROskore was created to network and build relationships with other professionals. It’s designed to help professionals generate business, unlike Klout, which is designed to help advertisers generate business. PROskore is almost a combination of LinkedIn and Klout. The best part about it, it’s free. Although there is a paid version, you can probably get away with only using the free version with no problems.

PROskore targets itself toward businesses. So if you’re looking to use it for personal use it probably wont give you the information you need. If that’s the case, I would suggest sticking with LinkedIn and Klout. PROskore is designed for professionals (that already have businesses) to help them generate awareness about their business, and help them understand their professional reputation via social media.

This post can also be read on Marketing Conversations.

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